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  1. Flowers/Trees
  2. Sunday, 28 August 2016
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Joann M.
I also got the same parade rose bush (different color) for Mother's Day from my family. They just do not last! I have been very careful with both, but even more careful with this one because the other one finally died on me.... i don't over water it, but I keep it moist. as each bloom fades I snip it off. It looks like there are about 3 or 4 small plants in one container.... one by one they start to die. The last 2 buds never even opened. I put it near the kitchen window (inside) I have many African Violets that thrive and bloom constantly. So I think I should be able to keep this plant alive. No such luck... how do I tell my friends that the plant they gave me died? gees. Are they meant to just die after a few blooms? I don't want to have anyone buy me anymore and have this happen again. Very disappointed.
Joann Marsh
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i am very sorry that you had a poor experience with our Parade Roses I am posting some information on how to care for your parade rose if it is not doing well. I hope you find this information helpful.


Parade roses (Rosa) are miniature versions of the standard garden rose and can be grown successfully indoors with a little extra care. They come in a variety of colors including red, pink and yellow. If your parade rose is dying, several factors could be contributing to its wilting leaves or sagging blooms. Make sure it receives lots of light, water and food to help nurse it back to full, blooming health.

Place the parade rose in a warm, sunny location, such as a south-facing window. They need about six hours of full sun each day. Without enough sun, the leaves begin to curl and fall off. Move it to a room brightly lit with fluorescent lights when the sun goes down to help supplement the plant's light needs. Without enough light, the stems become leggy, which means they grow taller without producing many leaves. This hurts the plant, as there aren't enough leaves to support the long stems or blooms.

Water your plant daily, making sure the soil is well-drained. Stick your finger into the soil to the second knuckle; the soil should feel damp at least that deep after watering. Miniature roses have shallow root systems, especially when potted indoors, so they need frequent watering. Without proper water, the leaves tend to turn yellow and begin to wilt.

Mist the leaves and blooms with water every other day. Roses like humid conditions, so misting the leaves helps increase the humidity around the plant. Another option is to place a tray of water and river rocks around the base of the plant; the water adds humidity around the plant as it evaporates.

Fertilize the parade rose plant every three weeks. If it's been a while since you fertilized, the plant might not be getting enough food to sustain itself. Use a balanced fertilizer, such as a 10-10-10, and mix it to half the recommended strength.

Prune off dead stems and blooms so the plant can focus its energy on keeping healthy stems and leaves alive. Don't prune back healthy stems during the growing season; save that for early spring, while the plant is dormant.

Repot the plant if you can see roots peeking out from the soil or if the leaves continue to look droopy after watering. Parade roses don't mind crowded pots, but they can become root-bound fairly quickly. Try to repot once a year in the fall, just before the plant becomes dormant. However, repotting during the growing season can save your plant if it's starting to die. Pull it gently from the pot, and shake the dirt from the roots. Pour sterile potting soil into the bottom of a larger pot -- which should be wider than the original pot but doesn't have to be deeper -- and set the plant in the pot. The base of the stem should be even with the top of the pot; add more soil to the bottom if necessary. Fill around the roots with more potting soil, but don't tamp it down; it needs to be loose and well-drained to keep the roots healthy.
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  1. more than a month ago
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Gene F Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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I have been able to keep miniature roses alive for 2-3 years. I water mine every day with a very dilute solution of miracle-gro. I make sure the water drains completely from soil before I put it back on the 'plate' on which the pot sits. The soil in which the miniature roses are planted typically do not hold a lot of moisture. If planted in a compost-rich soil, the roots may sit in wet soil and the roots will rot. If you forget watering for even one day with the plant in a south-facing window, the soil may dry out and the leaves will wilt.
I usually use a south-facing window, but I keep the rose plants about 9-12" away from the window so that the plant and soil don't get cooked in the mid-day/afternoon sun.

Are you by any chance watering the plant through the leaves? If so water them around lunch time, to allow the leaves to dry before nightfall. If the leaves stay wet, they'll develop fungus infection and die.

I second the comment, above, that the miniature roses have very shallow root systems. Because of that, you have to pay closer attention to the watering than with a carpet rose.

After the end of the 2nd bloom cycle, I move them outdoors into a slightly larger (up to 6";) pot, and let the roots grow out and get into the next bloom cycle before bringing them back indoors. The picture I have attached is the a pink miniature rose between bloom cycles which I repotted about a month ago. It has a little bit of leaf burn because we had several 100+ degree days and I left it out in the direct sun all day.

I have also had success with putting miniature roses in a north-facing window, but I keep them there for no more than a month at a time.
My miniature roses overwinter under a grow light indoors.
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Joann M. wrote:

I also got the same parade rose bush (different color) for Mother's Day from my family. They just do not last! I have been very careful with both, but even more careful with this one because the other one finally died on me.... i don't over water it, but I keep it moist. as each bloom fades I snip it off. It looks like there are about 3 or 4 small plants in one container.... one by one they start to die. The last 2 buds never even opened. I put it near the kitchen window (inside) I have many African Violets that thrive and bloom constantly. So I think I should be able to keep this plant alive. No such luck... how do I tell my friends that the plant they gave me died? gees. Are they meant to just die after a few blooms? I don't want to have anyone buy me anymore and have this happen again. Very disappointed.
Joann Marsh
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thank you for all of the replies and suggestions. I am just not sure why my roses all died... so sad... I was so careful. I live in the California Desert, so the roses had to stay in doors. (very hot summer here) I made sure it was close to the kitchen window, with loads of light. I watered it from below the pot in the saucer, like I water my African Violets. I trimmed off the roses as they wilted off. The leaves were coming off from the beginning. If I moved the rose bush at all the leaves just fell off. I gave it light vitamins. I talked to it, LOL. I just feel so badly. They have all been purchased from Trader Joe's. Could that be the problem? should I try again? I absolutely love roses... Any suggestions about where to purchase them from would be greatly appreciated.
Joann Marsh
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Gene F Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Joanne, I've never watered from the saucer. I don't know how much of the water would make it to the 'near surface'. I just pour into the top edge of the pot at a couple of diametrically opposite positions until the water starts coming out the bottom. I never let the soil dry completely, or else my watering would just run through the dry, loose soil and not retain the water.

With you living in the desert, the humidity will be very low, especially if you use an air conditioner. Misting would be especially important (unless you use an evaporative cooler, which adds moisture to the air). How warm does the location with the roses get?
One other thought, if you get water drops on the leaves, the drops make 'lenses' which can focus the light on the leaves and cook the place with the water drop.
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